Reception Rooms of the Château

Entering the castle is like travelling back in time through the magnificent reception rooms arranged in a row. In the bedrooms and living rooms, exceptional period furniture, fabrics and remarkable architectural elements will ensure an elegant stay. The great care and taste brought to the restoration of the premises, provides a unique experience of a refined and joyful French art of living.

Four large main reception rooms have been rehabilitated and renovated in the spirit of the different periods to which they belong. A meticulous and technical work difficult to achieve as the materials used are precious and unique. Thus, the know-how of our craftsmen contributes to revive the soul of the castle and to remain faithful to our heritage, bequeathed from generation to generation.

The Fire Room or ”Pièce à feu” is the oldest part of the castle. This room illustrates the relative comfort in which the lord lived. The thick and uneven walls reveal two interesting architectural elements. First, the monumental fireplace that made this place the only warm room in the mansion. It was here that, lord and servant alike, gathered and slept. At the corner of this room is the well accessible from the inside with, at its side, a cavity to sit in. Even if this “fire room” has undergone some modifications, particularly for the windows and the location of the door, it provides an interesting testimony to the manorial living quarters around the 15th century.

The Salon Rose takes us back to the 16th century and to the developments carried out by Marin de Vanssay. Apart from the windows and the fireplace, redone in the 19th century, the volumes reveal a new and more comfortable way of life. The Vanssay family’s coat-of-arms that appear on the fireplace and one can be surprised to see typical Breton ermine. The Bretons having invaded Maine in the middle of the 9th century, some settled there, including descendants of the Venetians, in Latin “venetiacus” and would have given their name to Vancé, a small town about twenty kilometres from the castle. The Counts of Vendôme then took possession of this place in the second half of the 14th century before the Vanssay family settled in Conflans.

The Great Dining Room or La Grande Salle à Manger has a different ceiling height than the vestibule, we are in the 17th century wing. The more imposing proportions of this Dining Room make it, to a certain extent, a ceremonial room. The monumental 18th century china cabinet with its interesting work of locksmithing is quite stricking. The portrait of Charles-Achille de Vanssay reminds us of his eventful existence during a troubled period of History. First a royalist insurgent in Berry during the Revolution, he joined Napoleon who made him prefect, then continued in this function in the service of Louis XVIII. He went into hiding during the “Hundred Days” to become again Prefect under Charles X. In short, he’s our little family Talleyrand!

Even if the Grand Salon is located in the 17th century wing, its interior was taken over in 1778 for the wedding of Charles de Vanssay, the Prefect’s father. Thus the boiserie carvings and furniture for this drawing room were made for this event. As for the furniture, this set of armchairs and sofas specially designed for this room has seen the colours of the original fabrics change over the centuries. We are currently working to save them by rehabilitating them, so they are renovated one by one using their reverse side, unbleached by over 250 years of daylight. We are still far from finished but we are delighted with the bright original colours that we have discovered and that we are reviving.

Four large main reception rooms

  • The Pièce à Feu is the oldest part of the castle.
  • The Salon Rose takes us back to the 16th century and to the developments carried out by Marin de Vanssay.
  • The Grande Salle à Manger has a different ceiling height than the vestibule, we are in the 17th century wing.
  • The Grand Salon is located in the 17th century wing, its interior was taken over in 1778 for the wedding of Charles de Vanssay.